Pay gap stops shrinking but young women earn more than men

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The wage gap between men and women did not shrink between 2014 and 2016 but young women do now earn more than young men in the early stages of their career, according to new calculations by national statistics office CBS.

The new figures are corrected for factors such as level of education, work experience and working hours and show no change in the size of the wage gap between men and women.

Uncorrected figures published earlier show the public sector wage gap had gone down from 10% to 8% and in the private sector from 20% to 19%.




In the public sector, women earn more than their male colleagues up to the age of around 36, the CBS said. In the private sector, women outstrip men in earnings up to the age of 26, but men really start to widen the gap from the age of 32.

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The difference in pay can partly be explained by the different jobs men and women traditionally do. For example, if men and women are doing the same job, the difference in pay is 17%, and if they are both in leadership roles, the difference drops again to 15%, the CBS said.

Taking factors such as experience and working full or part time into account, the pay gap shrinks again to 7%, the CBS said. Differences which have not been factored in include the impact of career breaks to raise children, absentee rates and straightforward discrimination.

Just 25% of Dutch women have a full time job.


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