Sunday 15 September 2019

Women with heart failure benefit from lower drug doses: research

Photo: Depositphotos.com

Women with heart failure might need lower doses of drugs and beta blockers than men, according to a report by Groningen University researchers and published in The Lancet.

The researchers looked at the standard doses of medicines for heart failures across two large patient groups – 2,500 from Europe and 4,000 from Asia. They found that despite differences in age, weight and bmi, both European and Asian women could be successfully treated with half the recommended doses of the drugs.

Giving them more than 50% only increased the side effects, the researchers said.

The research also brings into question what the true optimal medical therapy is for women versus men, the report’s authors said.

Lead researcher Bernadet Santema told broadcaster NOS doctors are becoming more aware that the sexes need to have different treatments at times.

‘Traditionally, 75% to 80% of people in drugs trials are men,’ she said. ‘Here in Groningen, we do a lot of cardiology trials and we see the same.’

‘If you look back, it is remarkable that science has paid such little attention to the differences between men and women, when they are obvious for all to see,’ UMCG cardiology professor Adriaan Voors said in a press release.

‘Sometimes the biggest breakthroughs come from the most minor questions. The results we are finding could apply across far more fields.’

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