Tuesday 24 January 2017

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No easy answer for housing shortage for average incomes: PBL

Housing

The shortage of rental housing for people who earn too much for social housing cannot simply be solved by building more homes, the government's environmental assessment agency PBL said on Monday. In some parts of the country it is impossible for people on average incomes to find a place to live because of the rules for rent-controlled housing and high rents for non rent-controlled homes, the PBL said. The problem is particularly acute in Amsterdam and Utrecht where there are very few homes for rents between €710 (the social housing limit) and €1,000. Almost all housing with a rent of the below the limit is earmarked for people earning less than €35,739 a year. The PBL says the problem could be partly eased if housing corporations were allowed to rent property to high earners on a temporary basis. However, there are no easy solutions to the problem and new ideas have to be developed outside traditional solutions such as building more homes, the PBL said.  More >


House prices rise 6.7%

Housing House prices went up by 6.7% in December, compared with a year ago, which was the strongest rise since 2002, the national statistics office CBS said on Friday. In Rotterdam house prices have now outstripped their August 2008 high, the CBS said. Amsterdam and Utrecht broke the pre crisis level earlier. The figures are based on information gathered by the land registry organisation Kadaster. Nearly 214,800 houses changed hands last year in 2016, the highest number ever. Last week, Dutch real estate agency association NVM said house prices in the Netherlands are now almost back at their pre-crisis levels. The average price for a home is now €248,000, which is 20% up on the low point reached in 2013 and just 2% below the record high recorded in August 2008, the NVM said. Offices Meanwhile, property advisory group Dynamis said on Friday that a record volume of empty office space had been converted to housing last year. In total, 750,000 square metres of offices was given a new use and some 92% was turned into homes. The rest became hotels and shops. Arnhem leads the way in conversions, Dynamis said, followed by The Hague, Apeldoorn, Eindhoven, Amsterdam and Nieuwegein. So much empty office space has now been turned into housing that only difficult projects on industrial estates remain, Dynamis said.  More >


House prices return to pre-crisis levels

Housing House prices in the Netherlands are now almost back at their pre-crisis levels, the Dutch real estate agency association NVM said on Thursday. The average price for a home is now €248,000, which is 20% up on the low point reached in 2013 and just 2% below the record high recorded in August 2008. In Amsterdam, where the recovery started first, house prices rose 23% last year, taking the average price of a city apartment to €328,000. The shortage of property in Amsterdam led to a 36% drop in the number of houses on the market in the final quarter of last year. 'First-time buyers are as good as excluded from the market,' NVM chairman Ger Jaarsma told the Financieele Dagblad. The regional differences are extremely wide. For example, €248,000 will buy a 40 square metre apartment on the outskirts of Amsterdam but a 110 square metre terraced home in Amersfoort or a detached home with a large garden in rural parts of Groningen, Drenthe and Limburg. The NVM expects house prices to rise by a further 5% in 2017.  More >