Wednesday 04 August 2021

Longer articles about living in the Netherlands, Dutch society, culture and travel plus third party content from our partners

Nine things you need to know about having a baby in the Netherlands

Nine things you need to know about having a baby in the Netherlands

The Netherlands is notorious for its painkiller-free home births. But there are lots of other essential things you need to know to make sure you have a baby the Dutch way. The Netherlands by Numbers has a useful list. The home birth We’ll get this out of the way first. You can have your baby in a hospital. A generation ago, 60% of the Dutch were born at home but that has now dropped to around 20%. There are all... More >



It’s party time south of the rivers: get ready for Carnaval

It’s party time south of the rivers: get ready for Carnaval

Soon the south of the Netherlands will be plunged into the mayhem that is Carnaval, the feast that traditionally preceded the big fast at Lent. Here’s what you need to know should you decide to spend a couple of jolly days onder de grote rivieren (south of the big rivers) or any of the other, mainly Catholic, regions in the Netherlands where Carnaval is king. 1 Carnaval is a moveable feast. This year the festivities will kick off on February... More >


10 Great Things To Do In February

10 Great Things To Do In February

From the latest film from the Coen brothers and a major celebration of Karel Appel to all the latest designs and gadgets for your home, here’s our pick of the best things to do in February. Celebrate a modern master Karel Appel (1921-2006) is perhaps the most renowned Dutch artist of the latter half of the twentieth century and this major retrospective marks the tenth anniversary of his death. The 67 paintings, 12 sculptures and more than 60 drawings in... More >


Dutch start-up develops secure instant messaging for doctors

Dutch start-up develops secure instant messaging for doctors

A Dutch tech start-up is looking to hit it big with a doctors-only communications app which, it says, combines the benefits of Linkedin and Whatsapp in one secure instant messaging tool. MDLinking.com aims to connect millions of healthcare professionals worldwide so they can share information in a private and secure environment, without worrying whether it is being viewed by others or even used for commercial purposes. The idea for a secure communication platform for doctors came from Dutch vascular surgeon... More >



Taking the integration test: how do you deal with a noisy party next door?

Taking the integration test: how do you deal with a noisy party next door?

In the final part of his series on the formal Dutch integration process, Brandon Hartley visits an examination centre and looks at suggestions from people who have gone through the process on how it could be improved. Part 3: The Future Some who have gone through the inburgering process have welcomed the opportunity to become better acquainted with the Netherlands and to learn its language in a formal setting. For others, it has been an overpriced, ineffective and even humiliating... More >


How to feel at home in The Hague: the city hall fair is back

How to feel at home in The Hague: the city hall fair is back

Ten years ago, Englishman Billy Allwood launched the first edition of the Feel at Home in The Hague fair – an event where the city’s businesses and expat organisations could profile themselves to the international community. Now, after a break of nearly two years, the fair is back home in the huge glass atrium of The Hague’s city hall. ‘Even in the internet age, there is still a need for the international community to physically meet and connect,’ says Allwood.... More >


Going Dutch: The past, present and future of inburgeren, part 2

Going Dutch: The past, present and future of inburgeren, part 2

The second in Brandon Hartley’s three-part series on inburgering deals with the experiences of several people who have recently gone through the process and finds out that formal integration courses are not compulsory at all. Part 2: The Present Philip has a predicament. He and his wife Beverly are both from America and they’re currently facing the possibility of being fined if they don’t take the inburgering exams even though they’ve been living in Amsterdam since 1990. Philip received his... More >


US embassy in The Hague may become museum, hotel

US embassy in The Hague may become museum, hotel

The American embassy in The Hague may be turned into a hotel and a museum for artist MC Escher, local broadcaster Omroep West says on Thursday. The embassy’s new location in Wassenaar will open in 2017 and the current building close to the Dutch parliament will become vacant. ‘This is a major opportunity for The Hague to strengthen its international allure and tourist attractions,’ the broadcaster quotes city officials as saying. The Escher museum is currently housed just 100 metres... More >


Housing corporation Rochdale boosts flat sharing by friends

Housing corporation Rochdale boosts flat sharing by friends

Think you can’t afford to share a place with friends in Amsterdam and its surrounding towns? Think again. Housing corporation Rochdale has set up a system to help youngsters rent a place without needing huge deposits and massive salaries. It has never been harder to find a roof over your head in and around Amsterdam, particularly if you are new to the country and not exactly earning a huge salary. That is why housing corporation Rochdale has worked out a... More >



How to be a good citizen: the past, present and future of ‘inburgeren’

How to be a good citizen: the past, present and future of ‘inburgeren’

The controversial integration exam has filled the hearts of many immigrants with dread since it came into effect in 2007. With its changing requirements, strange exemptions and even stranger test questions, even government officials across the Netherlands have a hard time keeping track of its various components. In this three part series, Brandon Hartley takes a look at the history of inburgering, shares the experiences of several immigrants who have grappled with the exam’s requirements and presents their suggestions for... More >


How to be well insured in the Netherlands: in English

How to be well insured in the Netherlands: in English

New arrivals to the Netherlands are often surprised by the number of different insurance policies people have. But for the Dutch, having proper insurance for all eventualities is the sensible thing to do. Why the Dutch find insurance essential Being insured in the Netherlands is seen as common sense. We want to be well insured against a wide variety of situations. Suppose a faulty washing machine floods our apartment (or that of our downstairs neighbours). What if we accidently spill... More >


Locating your bike, feeding the cat: Dutch start-up boosts the Internet of Things

Locating your bike, feeding the cat: Dutch start-up boosts the Internet of Things

At the end of last year, Dutch start-up The Things Network raised €295,000 through a crowdfunding campaign to launch an open, free and decentralised internet of things network. Esther O’Toole finds out more. Imagine a house in which the plants alert you when they need watering or your cat is automatically fed. Then take it wider, across your neighbourhood and your city. The Internet of Things is a network of physical objects, or things, which have been equipped with software,... More >



Meet leading Dutch authors at a special literary event

Meet leading Dutch authors at a special literary event

Bookworms who want to find out more about Dutch literature should not miss a get together with several leading local writers at the American Book Center on January 9, writes Ana McGinley. Esther Gerritsen and Renate Dorrestein are among the best-selling authors who will be reading at the special event to celebrate the first birthday of publishing house World Editions, which focuses on bringing Dutch and other literature to a wider audience. After all, if your ability to read Dutch... More >


Theatres, concert halls have more volunteers than paid staff

Theatres, concert halls have more volunteers than paid staff

The Netherlands’ theatres and concert halls now have more volunteers working in them than salaried staff, according to national statisitics office CBS on Thursday. Ten years ago, theatres had twice as many paid employees as volunteers. In total, some 8,000 people now work in theatres and concert halls, while 9,000 people do voluntary jobs or work as interns. At the same time, theatres and concert halls – there are some 300 nationwide – earned more money from performances, non-theatrical events... More >


The 10 most popular features on DutchNews.nl in 2015

The 10 most popular features on DutchNews.nl in 2015

We’ve published over 200 columns and features on DutchNews.nl this year, covering sport, economics, society, culture and life in the Netherlands. Here is a list of the biggest reads. 1 Following in Van Gogh’s footsteps: 10 places where he lived We followed Van Gogh from Zundert where he was born, to Auvers-sur-Oise where he died. 2 10 Dutch ideas we wish we had thought of first The Dutch have always been an inventive lot: take the one-night tent, the storm... More >


Eight things about Avercamp’s winter wonderland

Eight things about Avercamp’s winter wonderland

Now that winter is drawing in, here’s a look at one of the typical and incredibly detailed wintry landscapes by Hendrick Avercamp. Visit the Rijksmuseum website if you want a closer look at what the people in this painting are up to. Who was Hendrick Avercamp? Hendrick Avercamp (Amsterdam 1585 – Kampen 1634) was one of the Netherland’s most prolific winter landscape painters. Winter landscape with skaters, painted around 1608, is a typical Avercamp with lots going on. Avercamp was... More >