Monday 22 July 2019

Podcast: The Breaking Brabant Edition

It’s a week of shattered illusions on the podcast as a former CDA politician in Brabant is jailed for his part in the Netherlands’ biggest ever drugs farm and a Jeff Koons sculpture meets an explosive fate in an Amsterdam church. Also: is the housing market overheating, why did a singing road lose its voice, and how did hawks and sea eagles become embroiled in a treetop turf war? Top story Former politician jailed for hosting Netherlands’ biggest drugs lab... More >


A Tiny House as a Dutch home?

Who would want to live in a space the size of a shed at the mercy of the elements? Deborah Nicholls-Lee finds out why the Tiny House movement is gaining ground in the Netherlands. Sometimes a queue forms outside Marjolein Jonker’s Alkmaar home. She enjoys showing people around her house, but at just 20m², only a few visitors at a time can fit inside. Co-designed with students from the TU Delft and parked since 2016 on grassy wasteland where a... More >



The best, and most bizarre, Dutch burgers

The Netherlands is in the middle of a full-fledged burger bonanza. It seems like there’s a cafe devoted to them on every corner, especially in Amsterdam. This means there’s a burger for nearly every taste, whether you’re a vegetarian or eat red meat with every meal. Here’s Brandon Hartley’s picks for a few of the best, weirdest, and wildest ones in the country. A burger for those who consider variety the spice of life Burgermeester – Amsterdam Since 2007, Burgermeester... More >


The Netherlands is full of valleys

As every cyclist knows the Netherlands is as flat as a pancake, bar a few hillocks in the province of Limburg. However, over the last few years, the Netherlands had become riddled with valleys. Food Valley, Metal Valley, Seed Valley – the country is positively mountainous. The fashion for valleys can be blamed squarely on the wits of those who decided to call part of California Silicon Valley because of all the tech companies that are based there. Perhaps not... More >



Podcast: The Arm All Prostitutes Edition

After scoffing all their Easter chocolate in record time, the podcast team return with news of the Dutch lawyer jailed for his part in Donald Trump’s rise to power, why the supermarkets came under fire for their part in English football fans’ latest rampage through Amsterdam, and the man ordered by his local council to hunt down and catch a school of vanishing goldfish. We also look at proposals to change the security law, in the wake of the sleepwet... More >


DutchNews.nl destinations: Rotterdam

With Eurostar now running a three-hour service from London to Rotterdam, the city’s fortunes as a tourist hub are set to boom. So, get over there now and appreciate the fantastic views, great museums and excellent cocktails before the British stag parties take over, says Molly Quell. Only slightly smaller than Amsterdam by population, Rotterdam is the Netherland’s second largest city. It is home to the largest port in Europe, a fact which is partially responsible for its diverse population... More >



'I plan to stay here forever, no question'

While he was working at NASA, Houston resident Carl Guderian decided he was ready for a change. A trip to an event for hackers in Lelystad wound up changing his life forever. He now lives in Amsterdam where he works as an engineer. How did you end up in the Netherlands? Around 1990, I was besotted with Mondo 2000 and Wired Magazine and I hung out with hackers. By 1991, I’d also gotten most of my way through a graduate... More >


Blogwatching: Five bands from Amsterdam

Ana V. Martins is a Portuguese actress and a writer who lives in Amsterdam. Her blog AmsterDive is about her relationship with Amsterdam with a focus on arts and culture. In this post, she writes about five of the lesser known Amsterdam bands who get her feet moving. Ah, bands from Amsterdam! Not the good old classics, not the über famous ones. Real bands composed of real people who make real sound and play in real concerts that real people... More >



Expatriate Archive celebrates 10 years

Thirty years ago, a suitcase full of papers and photos sat on a shelf. What that suitcase contained would go on to become the start of the Expatriate Archive Centre in The Hague. Now, it’s going on tour.  Molly Quell finds out more about a globetrotting piece of luggage. Years ago a group of Shell wives (as they referred to themselves) set about to publish a book on the experiences of the families of Shell expatriate employees to celebrate the... More >


From careers to childcare: IamExpat Fair

Need help with finding the perfect place to live, that next career move or even mates to hang around with? You’ll find all the answers at the fourth edition of the the IamExpat Fair in Amsterdam, which will take place on Saturday April 7 at the Westergasfabriek. The IamExpat Fair was set up to support internationals in the Netherlands and connect them with local businesses and service providers so the organisers are delighted to be hosting their fourth Amsterdam edition.... More >



12 great things to do in April

The Easter weekend may be set to be chilly and wet, but spring temperatures should be on their way next week – if we are to believe the KNMI weather bureau that is. So here are some great things to do this April. Join the egg hunt There’s plenty to do this Easter. You could try the traditional Easter market on The Hague’s Lange Voorhout on April 1 and 2 or take the children to join the search for the... More >


Happy Streets: Rotterdam mobile activists

A cheerful squad of urban agitators are using Rotterdam to conduct quirky experiments in social mobility. Is this car-centric city ready to rethink its use of space? Deborah Nicholls-Lee finds out more. If you wake up one morning to find your street covered in pink and yellow dots, a lawn where once there was a parking space, or a bike-through cafe in your neighbour’s front room, then it might be the work of Happy Streets, a mischievous but well-meaning group... More >



Learn from history, both good and bad

History’s saints as well as its villains carry lessons for the present, writes historian Tineke Bennema. I could see where Urk city council was coming from when it decided to name some of the town’s new streets after discredited sea heroes such as Michiel de Ruyter and Jan Pieterszoon Coen. I believe Urk didn’t do this to stir up controversy but to show that the history of human beings is not a blank slate but a product of the past.... More >


Podcast: Spekkoek and Straciatella Edition

It’s an election results special in this week’s podcast, as we discuss why local parties rule the roost, how D66 lost out in the cities, whether it can get any worse for Labour and who fared best of the newcomers, including Denk, the PVV and the Animal Rights Party. There’s also news of the ‘dragnet’ referendum, technological advances in football and death in the Oostvaardersplassen. Local election special GroenLinks and local parties are big election winners How the parties fared... More >



Farewell Facebook, we're through!

Economist Mathijs Bouman has said goodbye and good riddance to Facebook and he won’t be back (he hopes). I would like to start this column by offering my sincere apologies to all my friends. Bart Stoffels, Rineke Gieske-Mastenbroek: my apologies. A hearfelt sorry is also due to Witdietma Narain from Arnhem, Willem-Aart Hop from Spakenburg and of course Fokke Obbema from Amsterdam. Apologies too to Remco Dijkstra and Annette van Trigt. And even to Thierry Baudet who, to my surprise,... More >


Nine things to know about tulips

Spring is officially here and that means the Keukenhof bulb gardens in Lisse are now open. It is the 69th time that the gardens will have opened to the public and they are expecting over a million visitors in eight short weeks. This year’s theme is romance and so among the special gardens in 2018 are Cupid’s Garden, with a kissing gate, a Holiday Romance garden, with a tropical atmosphere under the palms and Rob’s Oriental Romance. For those of... More >



Brexit boom for Dutch clinical trials

The arrival of the European Medicines Agency in Amsterdam next year will be a major boost for the Netherlands’ own drugs testing sector, and moves are already being made to make the most of the opportunities, writes Max Opray. Amsterdam was announced as the new home for the EU regulatory body in November when the Dutch city’s name was effectively drawn out of a hat after tying with Milan in the final round of voting. The announcement prompted a wave... More >


Podcast: The Disaster Tourism Edition

With a week to go until the local elections, we bring you up to speed on the soap opera that is Rotterdam’s campaign and explain how and where you can cast your vote. Elsewhere, was ING’s about-turn on its CEO’s pay rise a victory for people power, and did Unilever’s decision to close its London headquarters really have nothing to do with Brexit or the Dutch government’s abolition of dividend tax? There’s also the remarkable story of the Paralympic athlete... More >