A round up of the best stories about the Netherlands and all things Dutch from leading international publications


The Van Gogh museum and Vans collaborate on a wearable collection of masterworks

The Van Gogh museum and Vans collaborate on a wearable collection of masterworks

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam has partnered with footwear and apparel brand Vans for a collaborative collection based on Vincent van Gogh’s iconic paintings. Drawing from his famed Almond Tree, Sunflowers, and Skull paintings, the collection includes sneakers in Vans’ classic silhouettes as well as shirts, bomber jackets, hats, and a backpack.  More >



How a notorious gangster was exposed by his own sister

How a notorious gangster was exposed by his own sister

Astrid Holleeder has arresting eyes—they are swimming-pool blue—but that’s all I can reveal about her appearance, because she is in hiding, an exile in her own city, which is Amsterdam. For the past two years, she has lived in a series of furnished safe houses.  More >


To plan its smart cities, the Dutch first looked at years of data

To plan its smart cities, the Dutch first looked at years of data

If you want to understand how far-reaching the effects of smart city technologies can stretch, look no further than the Netherlands. As a country with roughly 26 percent of its land below sea level, the Netherlands is used to supporting and maintaining major technical engineering projects. Today, it’s learning how to use data to take the country into a sustainable future.  More >


10 Dutch rappers you need to know

10 Dutch rappers you need to know

From Amsterdam to Rotterdam, there’s a talented rap community sprinkled throughout the Netherlands that’s bursting with global potential. A wave of new artists has emerged, leaving behind their inhibitions and channeling the country’s multi-cultural essence into their music.  More >



Holland’s struggle with its 9/11

Holland’s struggle with its 9/11

Nearly 200 Dutch people died when Flight MH17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine. Four years on, the relatives have to battle Russian disinformation, as well as their own emotions.  More >





Whose injera is it anyway? Dutchman patented Ethiopian staple in 2003

Whose injera is it anyway? Dutchman patented Ethiopian staple in 2003

Injera, Ethiopia’s staple food, was invented by a Dutchman in 2003. That’s according to the European Patent Office, which lists the Netherlands’ Jans Roosjen as the “inventor” of teff flour and associated food products. Teff is a plant endemic to Ethiopia, and the grain is used to make the spongy fermented pancake that Ethiopians eat with their meals.  More >



Why Dutch teenagers are among the happiest in the world

Why Dutch teenagers are among the happiest in the world

In a biology class at a secondary school near Rotterdam, Gerrit the skeleton is not the only one with a permanent grin. The Groen van Prinsterer Lyceum, which first trialled happiness lessons a decade ago, teaches some of the least troubled teens in the world.  More >



Mark Rutte: North’s quiet rebel

Mark Rutte: North’s quiet rebel

Angela Merkel may have closed the coffin lid on Emmanuel Macron’s EU reform plans, but it was Mark Rutte who dug the grave. Before the chancellor said France (and the rest of the eurozone) could forget any lingering hope that Germany will pursue a great leap forward in eurozone integration, the Dutch prime minister was leading the charge against exactly the same thing.  More >



Why are Dutch Americans so different from the Dutch?

Why are Dutch Americans so different from the Dutch?

Pete Hoekstra seemed a good choice for America’s ambassador to the Netherlands when President Donald Trump appointed him last year. Mr Hoekstra, a former congressman, was born in the Netherlands and grew up in Holland, a largely Dutch-American town in Michigan.  More >




Dutch city uses penis fountain to rebel against art project

Dutch city uses penis fountain to rebel against art project

When the Dutch city of Leeuwarden commissioned 11 fountains by modern artists to celebrate being made European capital of culture 2018, it probably didn’t expect such stiff opposition. Internationally renowned sculptors – including the British artists Cornelia Parker and Lucy Orta – each designed a fountain for one of 11 cities in the province of Friesland. For the city of Workum, Parker took her inspiration from a pair of lions on a 17th-century coat of arms, designing two huge replicas, with water spouting from their claws.  More >