Anne Frank centre stage on 80th ‘birthday’

The diaries and other writing by Jewish teenager Anne Frank, who hid in a secret attic in Amsterdam for two years during World War II are to go on permanent display, the government announced on Thursday.


‘Her diaries and writing will come home,’ to the museum now housed in her former home, the statement said.
Three diaries, a note book of short stories and a collection of her favourite quotes will go on show from November 1.
The documents have been donated to the museum by the Netherlands Institute for War Documentation, which was given them by Anne’s father Otto. He was the only one of the family to survive the concentration camps and died in 1980.
Short life
Anne would have turned 80 on Friday if she had survived the war and a number of events have been planned to mark the occasion. On Friday evening there will be a live tv broadcast from the Prinsengracht museum with guests from the Netherlands and abroad.
At Madame Tussauds waxworks museum, artist Silvester Peperkamp is painting a portrait of how Anne may have looked if she was alive today.
Meanwhile, the shed at Westerbork transit camp, where Anne was put to work dismantling batteries after her capture in 1944, is to be rebuilt on its original location.
The shed has been used for agricultural storage in Veendam since 1957.
For a list of international events click here


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